Notorious Nineteen

Summary:

New Jersey bounty hunter Stephanie Plum is certain of three truths: People don’t just vanish into thin air. Never anger old people. And don’t do what Tiki tells you to do.

After a slow summer of chasing low-level skips for her cousin Vinnie’s bail bonds agency, Stephanie Plum finally lands an assignment that could put her checkbook back in the black. Geoffrey Cubbin, facing trial for embezzling millions from Trenton’s premier assisted-living facility, has mysteriously vanished from the hospital after an emergency appendectomy. Now it’s on Stephanie to track down the con man. Unfortunately, Cubbin has disappeared without a trace, a witness, or his money-hungry wife. Rumors are stirring that he must have had help with the daring escape . . . or that maybe he never made it out of his room alive. Since the hospital staff’s lips seem to be tighter than the security, and it’s hard for Stephanie to blend in to assisted living, Stephanie’s Grandma Mazur goes in undercover. But when a second felon goes missing from the same hospital, Stephanie is forced into working side by side with Trenton’s hottest cop, Joe Morelli, in order to crack the case.

The real problem is, no Cubbin also means no way to pay the rent. Desperate for money—or maybe just desperate—Stephanie accepts a secondary job guarding her secretive and mouthwatering mentor Ranger from a deadly Special Forces adversary. While Stephanie is notorious for finding trouble, she may have found a little more than she bargained for this time around. Then again—a little food poisoning, some threatening notes, and a bridesmaid’s dress with an excess of taffeta never killed anyone . . . or did they? If Stephanie Plum wants to bring in a paycheck, she’ll have to remember: No guts, no glory. . . .

http://www.goodreads.com

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Defending Jacob

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If you are looking for a book filled with suspense and thrill, this is the book for you. From the moment I started reading to the very last page, this book had my full attention. Just when you start feeling sorry for Jacob something comes up and you made to second guess yourself. I loved it!

Summary:

Andy Barber has been an assistant district attorney in his suburban Massachusetts county for more than twenty years. He is respected in his community, tenacious in the courtroom, and happy at home with his wife, Laurie, and son, Jacob. But when a shocking crime shatters their New England town, Andy is blindsided by what happens next: His fourteen-year-old son is charged with the murder of a fellow student.

Every parental instinct Andy has rallies to protect his boy. Jacob insists that he is innocent, and Andy believes him. Andy must. He’s his father. But as damning facts and shocking revelations surface, as a marriage threatens to crumble and the trial intensifies, as the crisis reveals how little a father knows about his son, Andy will face a trial of his own—between loyalty and justice, between truth and allegation, between a past he’s tried to bury and a future he cannot conceive.

Award-winning author William Landay has written the consummate novel of an embattled family in crisis—a suspenseful, character-driven mystery that is also a spellbinding tale of guilt, betrayal, and the terrifying speed at which our lives can spin out of control.

http://www.goodreads.com

The Remote Worker’s Guide to Excellence

When I first read this book it was not relevant to my work life but I still felt it to be helpful. Now that I am no longer working for a corporation and take on contract work, excerpts from this book resonate in my mind. The best practices outlined within the book help me organize and prioritize my work and home life.
Creating work hours help me split up my day. I know when I am in work mode I can not be distracted with personal tasks such as blogging and reading. Work is work and personal is personal. Dzotsi recommends you create your workspace as if you were “at work,” would you take personal calls and work on personal things if you were in an actual office? Then it should not be done when you are in “at work” mode.
The more I work from home for my boss who is in another state the more useful this book is to me. I am looking forward to reading more books from this extremely talented author.

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http://www.amazon.com/Remote-Workers-Guide-Excellence/dp/1479278726/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1354721745&sr=1-1&keywords=remote+workers

Rescue Me

Summary:
She’s 33, unmarried, and stuffed into a Bubble Yum pink bridesmaid dress. And the whole town wants to fix her up with anyone with a dental plan . . .
Who’s going to rescue Sadie Hollowell now?
Everyone in Lovett, Texas, knows Sadie has always been a “notional” kind of gal. She got a notion to leave town ASAP and never visit her daddy (bless his heart) again. Now she’s back and got the notion to invite a good-looking, hard-muscled, total stranger to her cousin’s wedding. Better a stranger than some of the losers she’s dated.
Vince Haven got his muscles the hard way—as a Navy SEAL in Afghanistan. He’s staying in Lovett to visit his crazy aunt—the proprietor of the local Gas and Go. Before he can get the heck back out of the small town, his aunt makes him an offer he can’t refuse. Maybe he’ll stick around Lovett for a while. Maybe he’ll make a “go” of the Gas and Go. Maybe he’ll rescue Sadie out of that pink dress!

Such a Pretty Fat

Such a Pretty Fat:  One Narcissist’s Quest to Discover If Her Life Makes Her Ass Look Big; Or, Why Pie Is Not the Answer
Are you tired of books where the self-loathing heroine is teased to the point where she starves herself tiny in hopes of a fabulous new life?  Do you hate the message that we women can’t possibly be happy until we fit into our skinny jeans? 
Yeah?  Well, Jen Lancaster is, too. 
Jen doesn’t find stories like this uplifting; rather, they make her want to hug these women and take them out for fizzy champagne drinks and cheesecake and explain to them that until they figure out their insides, their outsides don’t matter.
Unfortunately, being overweight isn’t simply a societal issue that can be fixed with a dose of positive self-esteem.  It’s a health matter, so on the eve of Jen’s 40th birthday she decides to make changes so she doesn’t, you know, die.  Because what good is finally being able to afford a pedicure if she loses a foot to adult onset diabetes?

Bright Lights, Big Ass

Bright Lights, Big Ass:  A Self-Indulgent, Surly Ex-Sorority Girl’s Guide to Why it Often Sucks in the City, or Who Are All These Idiots and Why Do They Live Next Door to Me?
From the rollicking bestselling author of Bitter Is the New Black comes a brand-new collection of essays that shine a bright light on the big city to reveal the escapades of the outrageously unglamorous.
Jen Lancaster hates to burst your happy little bubble, but life in the big city isn’t all it’s cracked up to be.  Contrary to what you see on TV and in the movies, most urbanites aren’t party-hopping in slinky dresses and strappy stilettos.  But lucky for us, Lancaster knows how to make the life of the lower crust mercilessly funny and infinitely entertaining.
Whether she’s reporting rude neighbors to Homeland Security, harboring a crush on her grocery store, or fighting -and losing – the Battle of the Stairmaster, Lancaster explores how silly, strange, and not so fabulous real city living can be.  And if anyone doesn’t like it, they can kiss her big, fat, pink, puffy down parka.

Pretty in Plaid

Pretty In Plaid; A Life, a Witch, and a Wardrobe, or, the Wonder Years Before the Condescending, Egomaniacal, Self-Centered Smart-Ass Phase 



In Pretty in Plaid, Jen Lancaster reveals how she developed the hubris that perpetually gets her into trouble. Using fashion icons of her youth to tell her hilarious and insightful stories, readers will meet the girl she used to be.

Think Jen Lancaster was always “like David Sedaris with pearls and a super-cute handbag?” (Jennifer Coburn) Think again. She was a badge-hungry Junior Girl Scout with a knack for extortion, an aspiring sorority girl who didn’t know her Coach from her Louis Vuitton, and a budding executive who found herself bewildered by her first encounter with a fax machine. In this humorous and touching memoir, Jen Lancaster looks back on her life-and wardrobe-before bitter was the new black and shows us a young woman not so very different than the rest of us.

The author who showed us what it was like to wait in line at the unemployment office with a Prada bag, how living in the city can actually suck, and that losing weight can be fun with a trainer named Barbie and enough Ambien is ready to take you on a hilarious and heartwarming trip down memory lane in her shoes (and very pretty ones at that).